bewitch /bəˈwɪtʃ/
verb [with object]
cast a spell on and gain control over (someone) by magic:
his relatives were firmly convinced that he was bewitched.
• enchant and delight (someone):
they both were bewitched by the country and its culture | (as adjective bewitching): she was certainly a bewitching woman.

THESAURUS
bewitch /bəˈwɪtʃ/
verb
1
the villagers were certain that she had bewitched him: CAST/PUT A SPELL ON, enchant; possess, curse, hex; archaic witch.
2
we were bewitched by the surroundings: CAPTIVATE, enchant, entrance, enrapture, charm, beguile, delight, fascinate, enthrall. ANTONYMS repel.

ORIGIN
Middle English: from be-‘thoroughly’+ witch.


thrill
/θrɪl/
noun
a sudden feeling of excitement and pleasure: the thrill of jumping out of an airplane.
• an experience that produces a feeling of excitement and pleasure.
• a wave or nervous tremor of emotion or sensation:
a thrill of excitement ran through her.
• archaic a throb or pulsation.
• Medicine a vibratory movement or resonance heard through a stethoscope.
verb
1 [with object] cause (someone) to have a sudden feeling of excitement and pleasure:
his kiss thrilled and excited her | I'm thrilled to death | they were thrilled to pieces | (as adjective thrilling) : a thrilling adventure.
• [no object] experience a feeling of excitement and pleasure:
thrill to the magic of the world 's greatest guitarist.
2 [no object] (of an emotion or sensation) pass with a nervous tremor:
the shock of alarm thrilled through her.
• literary quiver or throb.

PHRASES
thrills and chills
the excitement of dangerous sports or entertainments, as experienced by spectators.

Thesaurus
thrill /θrɪl/
noun
1
the thrill of jumping out of an airplane: EXCITEMENT, feeling of excitement, stimulation, adrenaline rush, pleasure, tingle; fun, enjoyment, amusement, delight, joy; informal buzz, high, rush, kick, charge.
2
a thrill of excitement ran through her: WAVE, shiver, rush, surge, flash, blaze, tremor, quiver, flutter, shudder, frisson.
verb
1
his words thrilled her: EXCITE, stimulate, arouse, rouse, inspire, delight, exhilarate, intoxicate, stir, charge up, electrify, galvanize, move, fire (with enthusiasm), fire someone's imagination; informal give someone a buzz, give someone a kick, give someone a charge. ANTONYMS bore.
2
he thrilled at the sound of her voice: BE/FEEL EXCITED, tingle, quiver; informal get a buzz out of, get a kick out of, get a charge out of.

ORIGIN
Middle English (as a verb in the sense ‘pierce or penetrate’): alteration of dialect
thirl ‘pierce, bore’.

bolster
/ˈboʊlstər/
verb [with object]
support or strengthen; prop up:
the fall in interest rates is starting to bolster confidence | he wished to bolster up his theories with hard data.
• provide (a seat) with padded support: (as adjective bolstered) : I snuggled down into the heavily bolstered seat.

Thesaurus
bolster /ˈboʊlstər/
verb
an occasional word of thanks would really bolster the staff's morale: STRENGTHEN, reinforce, boost, fortify, renew; support, sustain, buoy up, prop up, shore up, maintain, aid, help; augment, increase. antonyms undermine.

ORIGIN
Old English, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch
bolster and German Polster.