April Fool's Day /ˈeɪpr(ɪ)l ˈfuːlz deɪ/ (sometimes called All Fools' Day)
noun
It is an annual celebration in some European and Western countries commemorated on April 1 by playing practical jokes and spreading hoaxes. The jokes and their victims are called
April fools. People playing April Fool jokes often expose their prank by shouting "April fool" at the unfortunate victim(s). Some newspapers, magazines and other published media report fake stories, which are usually explained the next day or below the news section in smaller letters. Although popular since the 19th century, the day is not a public holiday in any country.

April Fool /ˈeɪpr(ɪ)l ˈfuːl/
noun
A person who is the victim of a trick or hoax on April 1: [as exclamation] : Lucy was waiting right outside. “April Fool!” she said.
• A trick or hoax on April 1: [as modifier] : an April Fool joke.

1. peep /piːp/
verb
1
I peeped through the keyhole: LOOK QUICKLY, cast a brief look, take a secret look, sneak a look, (have a) peek, glance; informal take a gander.
2
The moon peeped through the clouds: APPEAR (SLOWLY/PARTLY), show, come into view/sight, become visible, emerge, peek, peer out.
noun
I'll just take a peep at it: QUICK LOOK, brief look, (sneak) peek, glance; informal gander, squint.

2.
peep /piːp/
noun
1
I heard a quiet peep: CHEEP, chirp, chirrup, tweet, twitter, chirr, warble.
2
there's been not a peep out of the children: SOUND, noise, cry, word.
3
the painting was sold without a peep: COMPLAINT, grumble, mutter, murmur, grouse, objection, protest, protestation; informal moan, gripe, grouch.

ORIGIN
late Middle English
pepen: imitative; compare with cheep.

Peeps
They are marshmallow candies, sold in the United States and Canada, that are shaped into chicks, bunnies, and other animals. There are also different shapes used for various holidays.
Peeps are used primarily to fill Easter baskets, though recent advertising campaigns market the candy as "Peeps - Always in Season", as Peeps has since expanded to include Halloween, Christmas and Valentine's Day; since 2014 it has been available year-round with the introduction of Peeps Minis. They are made from sugar, corn syrup, gelatin, and various food dyes.

shift
/ʃɪft/
verb
1 she shifted her position: CHANGE, alter, adjust, vary; modify, revise, reverse, retract; do a U-turn. ANTONYMS keep.
2
the cargo has shifted: MOVE, slide, slip, be displaced.
3
the wind shifted: VEER, alter, change, turn, swing round.

noun
1
the southward shift of people: MOVEMENT, move, transference, transport, transposition, relocation.
2
a shift in public opinion: CHANGE, alteration, adjustment, amendment, variation, modification, revision, reversal, retraction, U-turn.
3
they worked three shifts: STINT, stretch, spell of work.
4
the night shift went home: WORKERS, crew, gang, team, squad, patrol.

PHRASES
make shift
do what one wants to do in spite of not having ideal conditions.
shift for oneself
manage as best one can without help.
shift one's ground
say or write something that contradicts something one has previously written or said.

ORIGIN
Old English
sciftan ‘arrange, divide, apportion’, of Germanic origin; related to German schichten ‘to layer, stratify’.