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conceal /kənˈsiːl/
verb [with object]
keep from sight; hide:
a line of sand dunes concealed the distant sea.
• keep (something) secret; prevent from being known or noticed:
love that they had to conceal from others.

THESAURUS
conceal /kənˈsiːl/
verb
1 a leather pouch was concealed under the folds of his kilt | a mass of clouds concealed the sun: HIDE, keep out of sight, keep hidden, secrete, tuck away; screen, cover, obscure, block out, blot out, disguise, camouflage, mask, cloak, mantle, shroud; literary enshroud. ANTONYMS reveal, expose
2
up to now, he'd always managed to conceal his true feelings: HIDE, cover up, disguise, dissemble, mask, veil; keep secret, keep quiet about, keep dark, hush up, draw a veil over, sweep under the carpet, gloss over; suppress, repress, bottle up, bury; informal keep a/the lid on, keep under one's hat. ANTONYMS show, disclose, confess

ORIGIN
Middle English: from Old French
conceler, from Latin concelare, from con- ‘completely’ + celare ‘hide’.

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shrewd /ʃruːd/
adjective
1 having or showing sharp powers of judgment; astute:
she was shrewd enough to guess the motive behind his gesture | a shrewd career move.
2 archaic (especially of weather) piercingly cold:
a shrewd east wind.
• (of a blow) severe:
a bayonet's shrewd thrust.
• mischievous; malicious.

THESAURUS
shrewd /ʃruːd/
adjective
a shrewd businessman | a shrewd career move: ASTUTE, sharp-witted, sharp, acute, intelligent, clever, alert, canny, media-savvy, perceptive, perspicacious, observant, discriminating, sagacious, sage, wise, far-seeing, far-sighted; cunning, artful, crafty, wily, calculating, disingenuous; informal on the ball, smart, savvy; British informal suss; Scottish & Northern English informal pawky; North American informal heads-up; rare long-headed, sapient, argute; (be shrewd) have all one's wits about one. ANTONYMS stupid, unwise; ingenuous

ORIGIN
Middle English (in the sense ‘evil in nature or character’): from
shrew in the sense ‘evil person or thing’, or as the past participle of obsolete shrew ‘to curse’. The word developed the sense ‘cunning’, and gradually gained a favorable connotation during the 17th century.